"the Perihelion Spindle" -Maple burl, mohagony, and brass

The wooden elements of the Perihelion are all hand turned upon a wood lathe, while the brass mounting apparatus is entirely custom machined upon an engine lathe and a milling machine: other than the seven brass Fillister screws, every component is completely hand made.

The spindle headpiece consists of four separate components that fit together with sockets and tenons: this provides for concentricity as well as structural strength when permanently assembled.

The primary sphere is approximately 5" in diameter, and the whole piece stands around 17" tall including the pedestal. The spindle headpiece is removable with the unscrewing of the brass mounting bolt with the knurled head.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.


"the Thoringian Sphere" -Maple burl, mahogany, black walnut, glass and brass

The Thoringian Sphere was a self-imposed exercise in precision woodworking, with the added complexity of a multitude of machined brass parts: this sculpture has 160 handmade elements.

The wooden elements are all turned upon a wood lathe, while the brass lens mounting hardware was entirely custom machined upon a metal lathe and a milling machine. The twelve mahogany medallions were fabricated using several clever machining operations and inserted into bored holes located on the twelve equidistant nodal points upon the surface of the six inch diameter sphere. The pedestal base and riser were turned out of figured black walnut. The glass cloche jar and the lenses were purchased new.

The last photo shows the finished sphere sitting within the wooden log it was cut from.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.


"Nodal Kugel " -Cherry burl, Mahogany, and stainless steel

The Nodal Kugel was a self-imposed exercise in precision woodworking.

The wooden sphere was turned on a wood lathe out of a cherry log burl, while the pedestal base and riser were turned of mahogany. The twelve mahogany medallions were fabricated using several clever machining operations using a milling machine, and inserted into bored holes located on the twelve equidistant nodal points upon the surface of the 4.5 inch diameter sphere. Within the medallions are small stainless steel pan-head machine screws. The glass cloche jar was purchased new.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.


"Effluvious" -Maple burl, African Blackwood, maple, and brass

The primary sphere for the Effluvious was turned utilizing my Sphere Turning Apparatus, as is typical. The hemispherical hollow required the fabrication of a Cage Chuck so that I could mount the sphere upon my wood lathe and turn out the declivity.

The blackwood sphere was also turned using the Sphere Turning Apparatus, then carefully marked out with a height gage to establish the equator for final turning and splitting in half.

The brass parts were made from 1/4" thick plate on my engine lathe, and incorporated very tight surface details and specific chamfer angles. The 13 radial holes in both of the rings were bored back on my wood lathe utilizing my Direct Indexing Spindle Apparatus and my Horizontal Drill Head attachment for my compound table. The 1/16" brass rods were hand bent into place, with an emphatic twist in the alignment to add a sense of motion and eccentricity to the blackwood sphere captured within.

The brass pedestal riser was turned freehand with gravers upon my engine lathe, then let into a bored socket within a black lacquered maple base.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.

 


"Lacewood Floating Spindles " -in lacewood, black lacquered maple, brass and copper

These are two wood lathe turned spindles that hang within a window of my home. Both are pieces that require precision woodworking.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.


"Satellite Kugel " -Dyed Maple burl, Mahogany, and stainless steel

The wooden sphere was turned on a wood lathe out of a maple log burl, while the pedestal and riser were turned of mahogany. The stainless fasteners were threaded into counter bored holes laid out with a heavily modified set of dividers that I designed and fabricated specifically for this task. The sphere was finished with an aniline dye and sprayed lacquer.

The glass cloche jar was purchased new.

Photos by Curtis Almquist Studios.


"a Conical Structure " -in stainless, brass, and assorted hardware

While in college, I was hired by a computer graphics company as a Graphic Artist. A small machine shop was also inhouse, so I taught myself how to use the various machines. Eventually I became the fabrication specialist for the company.

This small sculpture was the first personal project I completed while learning to use these machines. Thus began my love for working with metal....